+2
Planned

FEEDBACK REQUESTED: Social Override Fields

Christine Masters (Director of Product Management) 4 months ago • updated 4 months ago 2

We are working on adding new "social override" fields to allow customization of these meta tags at an asset by asset level. The fields would include:


  • Social preview image: Ability to change og:image separate from main photo or teaser image.
  • Social title: By default it is the headline, but can be overwritten here.
  • Social description: By default it is the summary, but can be overwritten.

Here is the part where I would like feedback:


  • Twitter card: By default, we will use the "summary_large_image" setting, unless vertical or too small, in which case it will use "summary." If there is no image, it will use the og:image tag, and will use the "summary."

I can't (right now) create a default per section, so I need some logic that will get close. I think the following:


- We can have horizontal images use summary_large_image, and articles with no image, small images, or vertical images use "summary."


- I could have all articles with images use "summary_large_image," and only articles with small images or mugshot presentation images use "summary." Articles with vertical images would rely on Twitter's photo cropping AI to fix it. Or, an editor could go into the article and create a new social preview that fixes the crop.


- Twitter card could be changed with batch edit.


Let me know what you think!

Answer

Answer
Planned

Thanks Kevin! I've also spoken with some people behind the scenes as well and that seems to be pretty universal right now. Thanks!

Here is the overview on Twitter cards for those who aren't familiar: https://developer.twitter.com/en/docs/tweets/optimize-with-cards/overview/abouts-cards


I like the ability to customize this further and am glad this is being worked on.


Of the options I'd probably lean towards this one and just roll the dice with the Twitter cropping:


- I could have all articles with images use "summary_large_image," and only articles with small images or mugshot presentation images use "summary." Articles with vertical images would rely on Twitter's photo cropping AI to fix it. Or, an editor could go into the article and create a new social preview that fixes the crop.

Answer
Planned

Thanks Kevin! I've also spoken with some people behind the scenes as well and that seems to be pretty universal right now. Thanks!